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NOTE TO CHAPTER XVII 


Note, C.---Minstrelsy.

The realm of France, it is well known, was divided betwixt the Norman and Teutonic race, who spoke the language in which the word Yes is pronounced as oui, and the inhabitants of the southern regions, whose speech bearing some affinity to the Italian, pronounced the same word oc. The poets of the former race were called Minstrels, and their poems Lays: those of the latter were termed Troubadours, and their compositions called sirventes, and other names. Richard, a professed admirer of the joyous science in all its branches, could imitate either the minstrel or troubadour. It is less likely that he should have been able to compose or sing an English ballad; yet so much do we wish to assimilate Him of the Lion Heart to the band of warriors whom he led, that the anachronism, if there be one may readily be forgiven.

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